Seattle may be the coffee capital of the United States, but Rome is the coffee capital of the world. You’re probably pretty sure that Romans invented coffee, or discovered it, or somehow conquered it. Whatever they did, Rome coffee is certainly like no other coffee in the world.

That’s also because cafes in Rome are unlike any place in the world. Gathered around small round tables with fine white linens you face piazzas, fountains, and famous sculptures. Art, and history, and culture surround you constantly, and the robust cups of full-bodied espresso shots and frothy cappuccinos are just the icing on the cultural cake.

 

The 4 Rome Coffee Experiences You Can’t Miss

If you’re lucky enough to go to Rome then there are lots of places and things that you cannot afford to miss. While many of those pertain to historic landmarks and works of art, this reference tool is for all the Rome coffee related things you won’t want to miss. Here are 4 Rome coffee experiences you have to have when in Rome.

 

1. Drink an Authentic Cappuccino

It doesn’t seem to matter where you go in Rome, but they know how to make a cappuccino better than anyone else in the world. You can pop into any tiny café no matter how fancy, or how sparse, and you’ll get an incredible cappuccino every time.

It’s a drink that baristas in the US never seem to be able to replicate as hard as they try. Is it the machinery? Is it the Roman water? Is the heart and soul of the Italian people? Who knows, but one thing is for sure, as long as you’re in Rome, you should drink cappuccinos whenever you get the chance. You should drink them like water, which in Rome is to drink them like wine.

 

2. Stop by Caffe Greco

The Caffe Greco dates back to 1760, and it is the oldest coffee bar in Rome. It’s as quaint from the outside as you would expect with its arched doorway and curved awnings, and the inside is just as inspiring. The artwork on the walls is fascinating. The giant oil paintings hang in gilded frames just like at any museum in Rome. The plush velvet couches are perfect for reading a few pages of a book, or relaxing after touring the entire city by foot.

With a prime location right near the Spanish Steps you can easily dash in for a buttery croissant and a shot of espresso, take in the elegant atmosphere, and be on your way. You’ll get the satisfaction of a great shot of espresso and the knowledge that you’ve sat at a bar where centuries of artists and intellectuals came for refreshment.

 

3. Pop into Caffe Roma

Located in the Hotel Cosmoplita, Caffe Roma offers a wide variety of delicious Italian dishes, beer and wine, and of course coffee and espresso based beverages. Sample an Italian coffee or a cream e gusto as you dine by the open windows and look out on the bustling street. You’ll get prime people-watching space, and you just might imagine what your life would be like if you decided to stay in Rome and bounce from café to café and cappuccino to cappuccino. Perhaps the answer is lost and broke, but it just might be worth it, right?

 

4. Find a Little Bit of Home at Baylon Café

There are literally way too many cafes and coffee shops in Rome to narrow it down to just a few, but Baylon Café is a good one to know for several reasons. It has a quirky atmosphere, an extensive menu, and plenty of creature comforts. In fact, it offers free Wi-Fi, and you can even book a table in advance.

Sometimes when you are traveling in a place that is new and foreign to you it helps to have a few reminders of home. Nothing says home like a Wi-Fi connection and a good brunch option. Café Baylon as both making it the perfect home away from home when in Rome.

 

Get Inspired For your Roman Coffee Journey Today

Rome coffee is such an expansive topic that you probably need to read at least one entire guide book devoted to the best spots to snag the best espresso and cappuccinos.

This condensed version though just might have gotten you excited about all that Roman cafes have to offer you, and all the good food and good drinks that are waiting for you just steps away from living history.

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